Thursday, August 29, 2013

Hear Successful Product Launch Strategies from Colgate, EMC, Kotter & More

Ask anyone in innovation, the keys to success are getting the job done faster and better, and of course before your competition. The time it takes to bring an idea to market can make or break the success of even the most innovative products.

BEI: Back End of Innovation 2013 is bringing together industry leaders and innovation experts to share the secrets behind their successful product launches. From Colgate Palmolive's partnering with a breakthrough technology partner, to EMC building a continuous culture of innovation and Kotter International accelerating innovation and implementation, BEI 2013 covers everything you need for innovation success.  

Download the conference brochure for more details: http://bit.ly/19Q4VYE

Get their before your competitors - check out who's already signed up to attend:

3M Company
Accenture
Ansell Healthcare
Appvion
BigVisible
Booz Allen Hamilton
Calliopae Reims
Campbell Soup Co
Casa Pellas, S.A.
Chevron
Clorox
Coca Cola
Colgate Palmolive
Corning
Dartmouth
Eastman Chemical Co
EDP Inovacao
Eli Lilly
EMC Corporation
Energizer
ExxonMobil Research and Engineering
Genetech
GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)
Google
Great Place to Work Institute
Hewlett Packard
Hype
Imaginatik
Ingersoll Rand
Innospired
Innovation Excellence
Inovo Group LLC
Intuit
J&J
John Deere
K+S Ranch Consulting
Kimberly Clark
Kotter International
LEO Pharma
Lockheed Martin Corporation
MARY KAY INC.
Mechanical Engineering Department at Virginia Tech
Medtronic
Motorola Solutions
Nationwide Insurance
P&G
PBS Interactive
Product Development Technologies
Providence Health & Services
PSCU Financial Services
QuantumPM LLC
Samson Rope Technologies
Sanitarium
SickKids Research Inst Molecular Structure & Function Program
SmartOrg
Sonoco Products company
Southern Growth Studio
Starkey Hearing Technology
Tampere university of applied sciences
Tata Consultancy Services Ltd
The State of Nebraska
Thrivent Financial
Thrivent Financial for Lutherans
TiVo
Traction Labs
Turn
US Cellular
US Endoscopy (Division of STERIS)
USAA Enterprise Innovation
WD-40 Company
Wellspring
Xerox PARC
November 18-20, 2013
Hyatt Regency
Santa Clara, CA

Mention code BEI13BLOG & Save 15% off the standard rate. Register today: http://bit.ly/19Q4VYE
Execution takes time. Just taking initiative alone will not get innovation to work. BEI makes innovation happen. Join us in November as we put innovation to work in real-time, for real results.

See you in November,
The BEI Team
@BEI_Innovation
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Monday, August 26, 2013

Overlapping and combining different mixes is where the real definitions of opportunity emerge

The opportunity spaces companies define are often like a Venn diagram—overlapping and combining different mixes of the Six Sources. 

This is where the real definitions of opportunity emerge. Powerful, engaging, and strategic—they capture how we truly bring together the needs and wants of markets with the technologies, brands, business models, and organizational innovations that will satisfy them, surrounded by the conditions across the ecosystem that favor the two coming together. 

Kraft foods saw such starkly different territories for growth in food they split into two companies! 

The new company, Mondelez, formed in 2012, is the faster growing international snacks category with brands including Oreo, recently acquired Cadbury, and Ritz. 

One opportunity space is chocolate, with Mondelez setting a vision to be the world’s largest chocolatier leveraging brands including Cadbury Dairy Milk, Milka, Toblerone, and Lacta. Spaces within spaces include three regions: India, Brazil, and Russia, and two innovation platforms: bubbly and bite-size chocolate. 

They are looking at spaces at the intersection of brands, using Cadbury packaging style for Oreos in India and creating a Cadbury Milka Philadelphia cream cheese for Europe. Mondelez sees other opportunities in marketing through digital technology, partnering with start-ups for developing mobile apps to drive impulse purchases.- Killing Ideas, Ch 5, Big Spaces


Thursday, August 22, 2013

Trend Spotlight: Humanity (A visual journey)

In The 5 Trends that will Disrupt EVERYTHING: Macro Forces Shaping the Future, we noted how Humanity, Connectivity, Empowerment, Experience, & Health, are five BIG trends that will affect everything from Innovation & R&D, to Market Research & Insights, Futuring & Forecasting, Brand Strategy & Design to overall Marketing & Strategy in the future.

Today Steven Van Der Kruit, Visionary & International Trends Expert, FIRMENICH FLAVORS, who will be speaking more on the The Root of Trends at our upcoming Foresight & Trends conference, sent us these images that reflect how the need for humanization is becoming crucial and popping up all around us. Take a look:













Embrace the change. Be an agent of change. Tell the story, the one that is True, in a universal way and resonates with everyone. Inspire us!

How will you utilize Humanity to make the world a better place to live, work, and connect?

About the Author

Formerly a senior copyeditor at Thomson Reuters, a research editor at AOL,  and a senior web publicist at Hachette Book Group, Valerie M. Russo is editor at large of The Front End of Innovation Blog, The Market Research Event Blog, World Future Trends.tumblr, the Digital Impact Blog, and founded Literanista. She is the innovation lead and senior social media strategist for the Marketing and Business Strategy Division of the Institute for International Research, an Informa LLC., and her poetry was published in Regrets Only on sale at the MOMA Gift Shop. Her background is in Anthropology and English Literature. You can reach her at vrusso@iirusa.com or @Literanista.

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Priming the Innovation Pump!

By now you probably have already seen this article:

‘Like’ This Article Online? Your Friends Will Probably Approve, Too, Scientists Say

 It explains how the social user community is effected by the activity and approval of others.  The study makes note of the "herding effect".  When someone "likes" content, we tend to respond in kind.  Interestingly, when a negative response was delivered, the "crowd" jumps in, heaping on more positive input to try to "correct" the negative trend.  All of this is effected by who is making the comments (friends, our groups, others).

If there are lessons to be learned, ways to use this information to our mutual benefit we can find two "take aways".  First note the artificial trend when you see it.  And second use it to your advantage.  If you watch the video below you can see how an ideator, the inventor of an idea, gives the idea a "push" in order to gain crowd approval.

video

This distortion of ratings is neither our friend nor our enemy.  It is just a fact.  We all hear our fellows decry the lack of a "dislike" button.  Although in innovation management systems there is typically the ability to vote negative numbers (plus or minus points).  And in the vetting stages when a SWOT analysis is performed there are certainly negative attributes to be considered (weaknesses and threats).  

We always have the chance to dispute those negative notions. In fact a good concept has been subjected to a thorough thrashing from the negative perspectives of certain experts.  It gives a chance for proponents to defend the idea under a variety of circumstances.

So when you "like" an article, or for that matter when you vote for an idea in an idea management software environment, ask yourself if you're driven by your own intuition; your own instincts, or are you merely responding to the wisdom of the crowd.

Ron Shulkin blogs, researches and writes about enterprise technology focused on social media, innovation, voice of the customer, marketing automation and enterprise feedback management.  You can learn more about Ron at his biography web site:www.shulkin.net. You can follow him Twitter. You can follow his blogs at this Facebook group.  You can connect with Ron on LinkedIn.   

Ron Shulkin is Vice President of the Americas for CogniStreamer®, an innovation ecosystem. CogniStreamer serves as a Knowledge Management System, Idea Management System and Social Network for Innovation. CogniStreamer has been rated as a “Leader” in Forrester’s recent Wave report on Innovation Management Tools. You can learn more about CogniStreamer here http://bit.ly/ac3x60 . Ron also manages The Idea Management Group on LinkedIn (JoinHere). 

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Intuit, J&J, Roche, Motorola Share Tips on Successfully Integrating Ideas at the Back End

Have you ever asked yourself why innovation is such a challenge for many, yet so simple and successful for the few?

The challenge is not in the ideas, it's in the work and execution that makes that needs to happen to make that idea profitable. Without the successful integration of ideas in the back end, innovation doesn't happen.

Featuring all new session formats and learning opportunities, BEI: Back End of Innovation 2013 explores the successes (and failures!) of some of the most innovative companies. You'll return to your organization with the knowledge and skills you need for successful innovation execution.

  • Behind the Innovations: A Backstage Tour of Intuit
  • From Cost Center to Profit Center: Xerox PARC's Methodologies to Foster Repeatable Innovation
  • Disrupting Commerce: Touring PayPal's Innovation Center
  • Directed Innovation Methods to Successfully Move from Ideation to Implementation, Motorola Solutions
  • Accelerating Innovation - How Leaders Can Spark Innovative Ideas, Accelerate Implementation and Deliver Results at Speed and Scale, Kotter International
  • Innovation: Not a Case of "Build It and They Will Come", Genentech & Roche
  • Maintaining Executional Focus During New Product Development, US Endoscopy
  • The New Phenomenon in Driving Authentic, Innovative Corporate Culture, Johnson & Johnson
  • From Strategic Need to Product on the Shelf, Colgate Palmolive
  • Plus, additional case studies delivered by EMC, Lockheed Martin, PBS Interactive and more.


Download the brochure for the full agenda: http://bit.ly/168MGw3

Mention code BEI13LINK & Save 15% off the standard rate. Register today: http://bit.ly/168MGw3

BEI: Back End of Innovation
November 18-20, 2013
Hyatt Regency
Santa Clara, CA

Execution takes time. Just taking initiative alone will not get innovation to work. BEI makes innovation happen. Join us in November as we put innovation to work in real-time, for real results.

See you in November,

The BEI Team
@BEI_Innovation

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Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Voices From Last Year: The Biggest Innovation Team Challenge

We are featuring a blog series entitled, “Voices From Last Year” to highlight key themes that BEI Back End of Innovation attendees took away from last year’s event. At BEI 2012 Michael Stratton, Ph.D. Enterprise Project Management Office, The Boeing Company, shared some of the biggest challenges that innovation teams face today.

BEI is all about the strategy and execution of innovation. It’s a conference where the entire innovation process comes to life- from leadership & organizational structure, to optimizing the idea portfolio, to process and strategy, to commercializing new ideas, ultimately driving bottom line profitability.

According to Stratton when it comes to innovation teams, communication is the most important and the most difficult thing to do. He works with a lot of different teams, and in some cases, they are totally virtual. He suggests that when dealing with teams virtually, you just have to be a little more creative in your management strategy.


Check out the full interview below:


Do you agree with Dr. Stratton? Share your thoughts with us!


Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist at IIR USA in New York City, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the tech industry.  She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc. 
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Monday, August 12, 2013

Opportunity landscaping breaks down the imaginary walls built through industry

Tasty Food Abundance in Healthy Europe
Tasty Food Abundance in Healthy Europe (Photo credit: epSos.de)
Exclusive First Read Every week through October 2013, we will post a short excerpt from our Summer Innovation Book Club Pick: Killing Ideas - You can kill an idea, you can't kill an opportunity By NewEdge CEO, Dr. Pam Henderson

Opportunity landscaping is a creative, insight driven, bottom up process for which different organizations will arrive at different territories. In fact, two companies in the same industry should define their opportunities differently! 

The markets they operate in may be the same but their capabilities and ecosystem relationships will be different, meaning their opportunities will not be the same. Two food companies may operate in the same industry but will arrive at different opportunities. 

One may have deeper packaging and design capabilities causing them to focus on premium and higher margin products, while the other may be stronger in their distribution causing them to focus on foods for convenience stores and food service. The capabilities determining the types of value they can create will vary, and their opportunities will take different shape.

Opportunity landscaping breaks down the imaginary walls. 

For example, across the board food companies are determining how they will go after the territory of health and wellness. Vegetable company Del Monte might be keen to leverage the insights of Dr. Oz, one of the leading voices in health, who has recently touted canned and frozen vegetables as the affordable approach to healthy eating. 

Hormel, maker of the iconic Spam, might focus on increasing protein in diets, leveraging their healthy turkey brand Jennie O. New Zealand-based dairy giant, Fonterra, may focus on finding ways to bring milk into new snacking occasions, as exemplified by their highly successful launch of Mammoth—a protein fortified coffee drink for men on the go. 

Alternatively, Whitewave, makers of Silk soy, rice, and almond milks, as well as organic dairy products, may focus on the origins of the food. 
... 
The ways a company defines these will be truly unique to them as a function of what they can bring to the table! - Killing Ideas, Ch 5, Big Spaces

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

The 5 Trends that will Disrupt EVERYTHING: Macro Forces Shaping the Future

We are very good at following and perhaps even spotting trends in their infancy. We are seeing massive global cultural shifts happening and the web has made them accessible to all.

In researching and creating the 2013 program for Foresight & Trends (#FT13), we narrowed it down to these five trends that will affect everything from Innovation & R&D, to Market Research & Insights, Futuring & Forecasting, Brand Strategy & Design to overall Marketing & Strategy.

These are the five macro forces shaping the future as a greater context of where trend insight is born: Humanity, Connectivity, Empowerment, Experience, & Health:


We are re-imagining a new world together. Join us to learn more about how to synthesizing world trends, brand strategy, innovation, and human science into a future action plan: ForesightandTrends.com.

Get early bird pricing and reserve your seat today. Mention FT13BL to save 15% off the standard rate.

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

The Ins and Outs of Innovation

With BEI Back End of Innovation 2013 quickly approaching, we wanted to get an expert’s point of view on innovation strategy in today’s increasingly complex and competitive business landscape. We were in luck. Maria B. Thompson, Director of Innovation Strategy, Intellectual Asset Management, Office of the CTO at Motorola Solutions, recently sat down with us to discuss innovation strategy, execution, and culture.  Here is what she had to say:

IIR: What is a fundamental characteristic or skill to lead innovation?

Thompson: Abstract and analogous thinking skills are paramount to leading innovation. In order to coach and mentor others to unleash their collective creativity, one must be able to reframe problems and solutions in generic ways, so diverse-thinking non subject matter experts in the domain of the problem can engage, and bring their creative and novel perspectives to bear on a broader solution space.

“We cannot solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them.” Albert Einstein

IIR: What best practices support successful innovation execution? What typically stands in its way?

Thompson: The key aspect for successful execution on innovation is dedicated time and resources for conversion of the original idea to a commercial high-business-value product or service. In our experience, conversion must be treated as a first-class program deliverable, with time allocated in Program Plans and Performance Management evaluation systems. Our global Innovation Champions all have a Performance Management goal to spend 20 percent of their time on Innovation, which includes acting as evangelists for the best ideas and concepts that should be resourced and moved onto our product roadmaps.



IIR: What is the key to building an internal innovation culture?

Thompson: It takes a village. In other words, you need to have a “social” network of change catalysts committed to the innovation cause. We call these catalysts “Innovation Champions” and “Inventor Mentors.” These change catalysts are role models for innovation and inventing and co-resident at all global sites. They are selected for their past contributions to innovative products, features and services, and have performance goals they are measured on with regard to their efforts to support an innovation culture and to increase innovation yield within and across businesses.

IIR: What is the biggest obstacle you faced in your innovation strategy? How did you overcome it?

Thompson: Time and resource allocation. PDW, Performance Management… but mostly executive sponsorship. Without senior leadership supporting and visibly recognizing and rewarding employees for their efforts in prioritizing forward-looking work, people will prioritize “business-as-usual.”

IIR: What is a piece of advice you would give companies who are creating a corporate innovation strategy?

Thompson: Start by building on innovative work people are already doing. Prioritize the most important and strategic areas and communicate, communicate, communicate. Recognize ongoing efforts aligned with these priorities, support them, and reward them. Help everyone - across all functions- understand how they can contribute to the innovation pipeline – it is not only the engineering or research role to be innovative!

Thompson will be speaking at the upcoming BEI 2013 conference November 13-15 in Santa Clara, CA.


Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the tech industry.  She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmanadCicc. 


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Monday, August 5, 2013

Have you thought about writing a book about innovation?



It seems like everyone is writing a book about innovation.  There are certainly some famous authors and specialists (with great experiences from the innovation world) out there who can write books on the topic.  

For instance, my fellow blogger Gijs Van Wulfen recently wrote a great book, “The Innovation Expedition” that strives to enable business people with a visual toolkit for starting the innovation process.  I think his work can serve as a manual for the uninitiated.  So…he did it.

Writing A Book
I’ve thought of writing a book on the topic of innovation as well.  I still might. I did write a 33 page white paper aggregating the first year of my blogs back in 2010.  You can read it here. But that’s a pretty short book.

It seems I should be able to amass all the blog entries I’ve contributed since then into a single volume and title it “Achieving Adoption and Engagement Success with a Collaborative Innovation System Deployment”.  Stand by for that…for the moment I have a day job helping large organizations acquire licenses to those systems.  Plus that title sounds boring even to me.

Collaborating On A Book
Earlier this year, in May, I was asked to participate in writing a chapter of a new book.  The book is designed to be a textbook for University students in Eastern Europe studying business and innovation.  

Our chapter focused on 

  • the current state, 
  • the new challenges 
  • and trends that are emerging concerning 

"Managing communication and creative ideation for sustainable innovation". 

Working with an assistant professor (from the University of Novi Sad, Serbia, covering subjects in business communication) and an Associate Professor (of Technology Management and Innovation from a university in Florida), we first responded to a sketch for the paper, then the extended abstract for submission, and finally the working paper. There is no publication fee.  This is a noncommercial project that will produce a doctoral conference and a three volume book for engineers and managers in Eastern Europe.

The book will be part of the "Engineering Management - Challenges for the Future" publication.

We first wrote the title with "sustainable innovation" at the end, trying to accent that “innovation needs to perpetuate”, but realized it could bring confusion (misleading to environmental-related innovation).   "Continuous innovation" was a bad choice also, as it relates to a specific type of innovation. Also, we want to concentrate on the creative potentials of both the company employees, the company external partners and users. Hence the title we selected:
"Improving open innovation: Challenges for managing communication and creative ideation".

Two PhD.’s And A Sales Professional
Working with two academics can prove intimidating.  Their contributions were heavily footnoted with citations from research.   


My work on the other hand is a combination of 

  • best practices gleaned from deployments, 
  • anecdotes from users of collaborative innovation systems, 
  • and intuitive leaps engendered by psychological/sociological studies I read from other fields. 


Any confidence I have in my method is supported by the “TRIZ” theory of innovation which subscribes to the notion that an innovation useful in one industry should be portable and useful in another.

It is much easier to write by yourself.  You pick your topic, you gather your material. You get it on paper using the grammar skills you learned in school.  Hopefully it will be well written, informative, entertaining and engaging. 

Collaborative Writing
Working with two collaborative writing partners is harder.  You have to take turns.  You have to be respectful of others contributions.  Someone has to take the bull by the horns and make decisions about what goes where (and what gets left out).  By the way, on this project that person wasn’t me. 

The process took about three months.  We generated about 18 pages (almost five of which were those footnoted citations). 

Being Proud Of One’s Work
I write these blogs thinking the practices we learn out in the field might prove useful to readers who are administering collaborative innovation social networks or idea management systems.  The book chapter serves the same purpose…students (readers) should be able to read the material and walk into a project for idea crowd sourcing armed with a reasonable foundation.  They should be able to set goals, outline a launch plan and manage expectations.  So I think it was a successful endeavor.

What’s Next?
So I can claim credit for having written at least a hundred blogs (on innovation, customer experience management, enterprise feedback management and voice of the customer).  I can also claim credit for writing a lengthy white paper on innovation.  Now I’m a co-author of a chapter on innovation in a textbook for future business leaders.

Stand by for that book.


Ron Shulkin blogs, researches and writes about enterprise technology focused on social media, innovation, voice of the customer, marketing automation and enterprise feedback management.  You can learn more about Ron at his biography web site:www.shulkin.net. You can follow him Twitter. You can follow his blogs at this Facebook group.  You can connect with Ron on LinkedIn.   

Ron Shulkin is Vice President of the Americas for CogniStreamer®, an innovation ecosystem. CogniStreamer serves as a Knowledge Management System, Idea Management System and Social Network for Innovation. CogniStreamer has been rated as a “Leader” in Forrester’s recent Wave report on Innovation Management Tools. You can learn more about CogniStreamer here http://bit.ly/ac3x60 . Ron also manages The Idea Management Group on LinkedIn (JoinHere).

Exploring and mapping is not enough; we need to interpret what we’ve found

Exclusive First Read Every week through October 2013, we will post a short excerpt from our Summer Innovation Book Club Pick: Killing Ideas - You can kill an idea, you can't kill an opportunity By NewEdge CEO, Dr. Pam Henderson

A German cartographer, a proofreader, a Latinist, and the nephew of a saint all got together one day to do a puzzle. They met high in the mountains of what is now Alsace Lorraine, France, in 1507. 

The puzzle they were trying to complete was the map of the world. The pieces were comprised of accounts of journeys and pictures of bits of the world. 

Some of the pieces were Ptolemy’s; some were the accounts of Bartholomew Columbus and Amerigo Vespucci; and some were scattered pages bought on the black market. 

There may even have been pieces from Chinese explorations as there is speculation that perhaps this is how the map makers gained insights regarding the Rocky Mountains of North America and the Andes of South America—both of which had not yet been explored by Europeans.

When the puzzle was finished, a new picture emerged. A picture of the world as having four major parts rather than three.
Exploring and mapping new lands is not enough. We need to interpret what we have found, structure how we will think about the opportunities.   - Killing Ideas, Ch 5, Big Landscape

Thursday, August 1, 2013

How do you translate trends?

Calling all Futurists, Trend Spotters, Directors of Foresight, Innovation, R&D, and anyone charged with Future Planning -You are invited to join a New World Re-Imagined.

Welcome to Foresight & Trends 2013 (FT'13), formerly known as Future Trends, exploratory experiences that translate visionary knowledge into a strategic plan for capturing future opportunities. The new website is now live and the full program is available for download.

From prediction to implementation: build on what you currently know, add to what you don't, contextualize through pragmatic examples, Implement through workshop intensives, and find out exactly HOW to synthesize visionary knowledge and make it commercially relevant for you and your business.

FT'13  uncovers macro forces that are shaping the future - and dialogues around the trends that result from these global culture shifts - then translates these trends into opportunities that will ensure your future relevance and success.

Download the agenda to see the speaker faculty along with full detail on Contextualization sessions, Implementation workshops and Exploratory experiences which cater to the specific needs of YOUR role:
Innovation
Trends and Futuring

FT '13 is layered with exploratory experiences that take you outside the conference room and deep into the heart of Los Angeles for Culture Safaris, Trenz®Walks, and a narrated gallery tour of the infamous Artwalk district by a renowned graffiti artist and former gallery owner. This integrated content through experience approach results in a strategic action plan for capturing future opportunities...

It's all about the HOW not the what.      

FT13 - The antidote to conventional learning.

This is YOUR invitation to uncover and capture new opportunities and ensure future business relevance.

*Mention your blog reader code FT13BL to save 15% the standard rate today.

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