Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Is Brainstorming Detrimental to Good Idea

In the article: Innovation Is About Arguing, Not Brainstorming. Here’s How To Argue Productively by Daniel Sobol at Fastcodesign.com, it's argued that innovation’s secret sauce is deliberative discourse and the following five key rules of engagement apply to arguing and discussing ideas:

1. NO HIERARCHY
2. SAY “NO, BECAUSE”
3. DIVERSE PERSPECTIVES
4. FOCUS ON A COMMON GOAL
5. KEEP IT FUN

Do you agree? Are there benefits/disadvantages to brainstorming in the traditional sense or should be a democratic discourse as noted by Sobol?

1 comment:

Sean said...

2 and 4 are tricky.
2 should probably be embraced more than it is, but requires a participant mentality which seems difficult to find: the ability to say "no" without being closed to an idea. If someone is closed to the very notion of an idea, they'll be able to come up with any number of reasons it won't work, but constructively solving those problems won't bring the nay-sayer any closer to being on board, and the idea will get that much less realistic opportunity to grow and succeed. Saying "No, but ONLY because..." may be a more constructive mentality.
4 I'm not sure I agree with at all. I've seen multiple situations where when multiple perspectives are brought into a room, each comes with their own goal/problem that only they are experiencing. Yes, there needs to be some agreement of which problem an idea is attempting to solve, or else you can go back and forth all day and never agree that an idea is relevant/useful, but sometimes the problems that others bring to a brainstorm are far more pressing and fundamental than what the organizer believed the goal to be.

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