Monday, February 28, 2011

The Innovation Consultant/Idea Management Software Partnership

I spend half my time speaking with potential users of our idea management software. I spend the other half of my time nurturing relationships with potential partners. These organizations vary in size and area of expertise but they have at least one thing in common: They all offer their knowledge on a consultative basis to large organizations on the topic of Innovation.

Some of these folks are New Product Development people. Some have a focus for Organizational Change. Some conduct “Ideation” sessions or they facilitate Brainstorming meetings. Their clients are organizations that embrace a culture of innovation and they are bringing subject matter expertise to the table.

Companies use outside consultants in Innovation for the same reasons they bring in outside consultants for anything. They want to accomplish a goal and they don’t have every piece of the puzzle solved using in-house people. This is especially true in the economic climate we’ve been in for the last couple of years. It may be more cost effective to periodically bring in a team of Innovation Experts than to fund them as full time employees.

Even if an organization has a Senior Chief Innovation Officer they might not have any infrastructure underneath that person (again for budget or because the topic of Innovation is too new). These Innovation Officers frequently have to borrow man power from other departments to execute an innovation plan. So it makes economic and organizational sense to bring in an Innovation Consulting Expert.

The nature of consultancy is frequently short term. We have a problem or a challenge. We don’t have all the right expertise in house. We’ll get some expertise from consultants in the field; task them with an achievable, measurable goal. And then show them the door after we’ve completed this self-contained business plan.

Aha! Here’s where idea management software comes into play. The ideation process is not short term. Nor is cultivating a culture of innovation. These require the company’s senior management to embrace innovation on an ongoing basis. Quite simply,” I want my people to be thinking of good ideas all the time. I want them to know they can put aside some of their working hours to have good ideas and develop them”.

But a suggestion box will rapidly be flooded because the person responsible for managing the suggestions cannot possibly filter through the ideas manually and productively. He or she will soon be overwhelmed. So when the inventors of good ideas see that no one paid any attention to their submitted idea, the ideators will just keep the next idea to themselves.

And the structured systems for project management or product management are too structured for the initial stages of ideation. The “fuzzy front end of innovation” requires an environment that is electronic and automated, with automated promotion processes based on pre determined criteria for automated promotion. This is because the problem won’t be that there aren’t enough ideas but there are too many ideas.

And the organization needs to be engaged on an ongoing basis. So a loosely structured, chaotic environment is called for so that ideas can surface serendipitously. And people on the team can collaborate on ideas. Then the thrill of watching co-workers contribute and collaborate on ideas will keep inventors coming back. That thrill is reward enough!

So innovation consultants can do their clients a great favor by recommending the use of an idea management system. The idea management system can even be tailored to reflect the outlook and style of the consultant. Stages in the ideation process can mirror the consultant’s methodologies. The Innovation Consultant can have their work augmented (not threatened) by the use of an idea management system.

We have different relationships with different Innovation Consultants. First off we have partners in this space that are small organizations and others that are international organizations with an “innovation practice”. Some prefer to remain idea management software vendor neutral. They want to serve their clients by giving them good advice including their awareness of the idea management software marketplace.

Other consulting organizations have learned they need a tool to promote an ongoing approach to ideation that supports the consulting company’s philosophy, so we tweak our software to have a flavor unique to the partner’s needs. Some consulting partners feel they can only support a finite number of vendors for idea management software because they want in an in-depth understanding of how the software works and offer our product exclusively.

Some of our partners share in the revenue that results from an introduction they make between our company and our now joint client. Most wrap their consulting expertise around the idea management software deployment. They help answer the questions: “How do we pick the first user community? How do we create organic growth of the system and increased adoption? What is the best ‘first challenge’ we put in front of our user community to give them strategic guidance? “

And even more consulting services can be wrapped around the deployment of the new idea management software. Engagements that only can be sold into the client if the client acquires an idea management software license. These engagements might include:

System Start Up

  • define project scope
  • defining a use case with clear objectives
  • defining measurable innovation and collaboration targets
  • designing a performing collaborative environment
  • train the seed team and prepare for kick-off

Pilot

  • monitor community adoption and activity
  • coaching the seed team
  • moderation of the tool-evaluation workspace
  • monthly steering group meetings

Roll Out

  • user adoption & organic growth strategy
  • communication strategy
  • implementation milestones

A Seeding Workshop can include a number of helpful steps the consultant can bring to the table. They can guide their client as they define innovation focus. They can help the client prepare innovation campaigns (seeds) and map the company’s innovation ecosystem (seed team, key users, and expert groups). Consultants, with their in depth subject matter expertise, can help the client describe role, motivation and barriers as well as help prioritize functional requirements for a secure collaborative platform.

One of the most important things an Innovation Consultant can advise their customer’s new use of an idea management system is to help them set measurable goals for the testing of the new system. What Key Performance Indicators will be used to judge the success (or failure) of the new system. “Will we measure adoption of the new system, the number of new ideas, the quality of ideas, the number of contributions to the new system besides ideas? Will the new idea management system be just for ideas? Or will we guide the use of the system to be part of the company’s Intranet and use it as a Knowledge Management system”. These are questions the Innovation Consultant can ask that perhaps the client never thought of.

The Innovation Consultant, the Idea Management Software People, the Client’s Lead Users, the company’s internal Innovation Managers will all be part of the newly launched system’s Steering Committee meetings that occur weekly, monthly or as needed. That means the Innovation consultant needs to be on site at the client in a billable role and on an ongoing basis.

The Idea Management Software Vendor and the Innovation Consultant

o Need Each Other

o Benefit by Working Together (the joint offering has much more value than merely the sum of the parts).

There is a symbiotic, healthy relationship between Innovation Consultants and Idea Management software vendors. The consultants continue to serve their clients by suggesting what they believe is the best software for idea management for the client. The Idea Management software vendor works closely with the consultant to make certain the consultant’s vision is consistently being recognized and met.

The client benefits by getting a holistic, ongoing culture of innovation. The Innovation Consultant benefits by extending their practice into engagements not previously required. The Idea Management software vendor benefits by putting their software to work at clients they would not have otherwise encountered.

Oh, yeah. I don’t want to forget the most important element in the relationships just described. Trust. Partners in Innovation are just like partners in anything. A basis for trust must be thoroughly woven into the partnership. Just like the song from Guys and Dolls, everyone must remember “Stick with me baby, I’m the guy you came in with”. Then the client, the consultant and the software team all get very lucky.


Ron Shulkin is Vice President of the Americas for CogniStreamer®, an innovation management system. You can learn more about CogniStreamer here http://bit.ly/ac3x60

Ron manages The Idea Management Group on LinkedIn (Join Here) http://bit.ly/dvsYWD . He has written extensively on Idea Management (Read Here) http://bit.ly/b2ZEgU .

CogniStreamer® is an idea management software tool. It is an open innovation and collaboration platform where internal colleagues and external partner companies or knowledge centers join forces to create, develop and assess innovative ideas within strategically selected areas. The CogniStreamer® portal is an ideal collaborative platform that invites users to actively build a strong innovation portfolio. In addition it provides a powerful resource for internal and external knowledge sharing. The CogniStreamer® framework is used by industry leaders such as Atlas Copco, Bekaert, Case New Holland, Cytec, Imec, Picanol and ThyssenKrupp. CogniStreamer® represents the best use of adaptive collaborative technology such to harness human skill, ingenuity and intelligence.

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

The Corporation For Public Innovation

C. Engdahl
The Big E of Big E Toys

At a time when the public is rightly concerned about the impact of sex and violence on TV, this administration is gonna protect the Muppets! We’re gonna protect Wall Street Week. We’re gonna protect Live From Lincoln Center. And by god we are gonna protect Julia Childs!”
- Toby Ziegler (played by Richard Schiff) from the television show The West Wing: Season 1, Episode 13 “Take Out The Trash Day”, Written by Aaron Sorkin (original airdate 1/26/2000)

Budgets – whether corporate, government, or personal - can be a difficult thing, especially in today’s economy. Just ask the Wisconsin State Legislature. What to cut? What to keep? Something’s always got to give. It’s just not possible to have and do everything you want. But when the prevailing milieu is all about cost-cutting, ever wonder whether innovation suffers? Does cost-cutting undermine future success?

At 4:40 A.M. on Saturday February 19, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to pass H.R. 1 Continuing Resolution (CR) 235 votes to 189. It was a resolution with significant spending cuts. After the vote, House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) in a statement said “Cutting federal spending is critical to reducing economic uncertainty, encouraging private-sector investment, and creating a better environment for job creation in our country. We will not stop here in our efforts to cut spending, not when we’re broke and Washington’s spending binge is making it harder to create jobs.”

What gets left in this cost-cutting wake? The EPA. The Corporation For Public Broadcasting. And more. Apparently though the Army, Air Force, and National Guard are still allowed to sponsor NASCAR teams.

Budgets can be a difficult thing. No question about it. I can’t help wonder though, whether cutting off funding for public broadcasting in particular might stifle the development of young future innovators or diminish the quality and distribution of important ideas.

Monday, February 21, 2011

The 50 Most Innovative Companies in the World

Fastcompany.com has released their 2011 list of the most innovative companies in the world.

The top 5:


Valerie M. Russo is a Senior Social Media Strategist at IIR USA with a technology, anthropology, marketing and publishing business acumen. She is a published poet and also maintains a literary blog. She may be reached at vrusso@iirusa.com. Follow her @Literanista.

At the heart of a good idea management system is a knowledge management system


Here’s a secret: At the heart of a good idea management system is a knowledge management system. OK, maybe that’s not such a big secret. But if you’re looking at an idea management system and it doesn’t have the components incorporating knowledge management then you’re just getting an electronic suggestion box.

Don’t get me wrong... Ideas are Good

There are many types of ideas an organization can glean from their teams. They can gather unsolicited ideas and gain incremental innovation (“I’ve noticed while doing my work that if we just did ‘this’ we could make more money”; or “do things faster”; or “do things more cost effectively”). You can let the market pull your team toward new ideas (“I just got back from a customer visit and they told me we should also offer ‘this’ product”). Your technical team can push new ideas (“Aha! I’ve tweaked our widgets and now they are much better”). And you can partner with those innovators at the University, those people in research environments, who can explore radical concepts never thought before in any commercial settings to develop “breakthrough” innovations”.

Idea management systems provide a workflow to assess all of the ideas listed above. They can ask all the smart people on the team to comment on the ideas. These stakeholders can poke holes in other’s brainstorms and make constructive comments. They can invite the experts they know to add their two cents and vote on the best ideas so the best ideas get promoted. These enhancing steps are all attributes of what is commonly referred to as the Wisdom of the Crowd.

Good Workflow

The very best idea management systems will also allow downstream steps in the process to include expert reviews. This might be a team of managers at your company, or a group of marketers or financial people or a mix. These experts (made up of teams that vary) can examine the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats this idea poses (commonly referred to as a SWOT analysis). Lastly a feasibility study can be facilitated examining the idea in the light of perspectives uniquely important to the organization: What is the competitive advantage? What is the strategic fit with our current product line? How much will this cost? Each of these steps can generate a numerical score so the best ideas can be ranked and promoted. Eventually the best ideas get put into development

You Need More!

But all that is just an electronic suggestion box without the type of collaboration a knowledge management system brings. With knowledge management attributes, the collaborative system mimics Facebook in many ways. Users can post interesting things when they discover them (“Oh look, I read an article you all might be interested in that has to do with the subject we’re discussing”) or images or videos or links or events or peoples’ profiles. And, of course, users can search for this information and retrieve it. This means I can go to the system to Solve Problems and Find Experts.

What You Need Can Be Found In The New Idea Management System

Besides idea generation, the collaborative tool has to be attractive enough to get people to log on. If the type of information I rely on to do my job can be found in the idea management system, I’ll log on with great frequency. And then at least I’ll be there when it’s time to submit and work on ideas.

You don’t want a big empty bucket when you kick off your idea management system. You need to populate it with something. So, for instance, every industry has their journals. If you’re in Aluminum, there’s probably “Aluminum Today”. If you’re into marketing services, there’s probably a “Marketing Monthly”. Your first step should be to have the RSS feed for the updates these journals provide automatically feeding your idea management system. This way users know where they can find this information.

If you already have a library of white papers on your topic they should be tagged and stored on the idea management system. When someone conducts research as part of their job, the idea management system should be where they share it with the team.

Outside Knowledge

Besides the knowledge management information an organization’s fellows provide, outside stakeholders can also contribute to the conversations. This means you probably need a module that constantly polls or “listens to” the internet looking for key words of use to your team. A good module like that can help the Plastics Company look for usage of key words like “Plastics” on Facebook and Twitter and web pages and chat rooms.

When a hit is discovered, perhaps using the word “Plastics” in a way no one internally had thought of, you can bring the new thought internally to the system and discuss it. Similarly you can identify those people (not your employees) out there who frequently talk about your topic and invite their opinions on the subjects you’re interested in (“We’re thinking of introducing a new plastic widget, what do YOU think about it?”).

Another useful module is a stripped downed idea management system that anyone can use with very good security features. You can ask for ideas from outside stakeholders (like your partners, your customers and the public). You can ask them to vote and comment on other’s ideas. Then pull those best ideas into the secure arena of your internal tool.

Why Knowledge Management?

Besides ideas, the two things most people ask for when they’re looking at idea systems are: “How can we solve problems?” and “How can we find experts when we need them?”. Knowledge Management attributes like the storage, tagging and retrieval of information is the enabling factor for those uses.

And Knowledge Management is also the basis of dividing your group into teams. If you have a group of people that want to discuss “surface cleaners” or “tensile strength of copper”, they can belong to the larger group of “everybody” and also belong to the subgroup with their very specific focus. Some of the organization’s challenges might be limited to their smaller group (“Have you solved the ‘strength’ problem?”). The knowledge they share in these groups can be available to ‘everybody’ but readily apparent to the smaller team.

With today’s technology (like a SQL database and a tag cloud for the files) all the collected information can easily be retrieved and reported on. A knowledge management system at the heart of your idea management system will make it more than just an electronic suggestion box.

Ron Shulkin is Vice President of the Americas for CogniStreamer®, an innovation management system. You can learn more about CogniStreamer here http://bit.ly/ac3x60

Ron manages The Idea Management Group on LinkedIn (Join Here) http://bit.ly/dvsYWD . He has written extensively on Idea Management (Read Here) http://bit.ly/b2ZEgU .

CogniStreamer® is an idea management software tool. It is an open innovation and collaboration platform where internal colleagues and external partner companies or knowledge centers join forces to create, develop and assess innovative ideas within strategically selected areas. The CogniStreamer® portal is an ideal collaborative platform that invites users to actively build a strong innovation portfolio. In addition it provides a powerful resource for internal and external knowledge sharing. The CogniStreamer® framework is used by industry leaders such as Atlas Copco, Bekaert, Case New Holland, Cytec, Imec, Picanol and ThyssenKrupp. CogniStreamer® represents the best use of adaptive collaborative technology such to harness human skill, ingenuity and intelligence.

Don’t Miss FEI Europe, March 2-4 in Berlin!

Time is running out to join us for FEI Europe, taking place March 2-4 in Berlin.


200+ European innovation and R&D executives will be in attendance. 
  • Abbott,
  • ABN AMRO,
  • Adidas Group,
  • Air Liquide,
  • Akzonobel,
  • Alcatel Bell NV,
  • AstraZeneca,
  • BBC,
  • BBVA,
  • BMW,
  • Bombardier Transportation GmbH,
  • Boston Scientific Technologie Zentrum GmbH,
  • BP,
  • Calzoni, 
  • Celanese Emulsions GmbH,
  • ChemCity Pty Ltd,
  • Chemetall GesmbH,
  • Coca Cola,
  • Cytec Austria GmbH,
  • Deutsche Telekom,
  • Dialego AG,
  • Doka Industrie GmbH,
  • Dow Corning Europe,
  • DSM, Eka Chemicals AB,
  • Electrolux,
  • Eli Lilly,
  • Ernst & Young,
  • European Patent Office,
  • Evonik Goldschmidt GmbH,
  • Extremis,
  • Fera,
  • Fidelity Investments,
  • Firmenich,
  • Fluid o Tech,
  • GE,
  • Grundfos Management As,
  • Grupo Aviador,
  • GSK,
  • Henkel,
  • Hilti Aktiengesellschaft,
  • Home Retail Group,
  • IDEO,
  • Infineum UK Ltd,
  • Johnson & Johnson,
  • L’Oreal,
  • Lenovo,
  • Life Technologies,
  • London Business School,
  • Lonza,
  • Mars,
  • Mars Petcare GmbH,
  • Nokia,
  • Novo Nordisk AS,
  • Oriflame R&D,
  • Philips,
  • Procter & Gamble Eurocor NV,
  • Rentokil,
  • Rio Tinto,
  • Roche, 
  • Rolls- Royce plc,
  • Runtastic GmbH,
  • SABIC,
  • Sanofi Pasteur,
  • Sappi Europe SA, 
  • Senz Umbrellas,
  • Shell, Siemens,
  • Stena Line,
  • Swarovski,
  • Turkcell,
  • Unilever,
  • Voxdale,
  • WD 40 Company,
  • Whirlpool Europe,
  • and the World Economic Forum.

For more information on the sessions at FEI Europe, visit the homepage.


Hope to see you there!

Friday, February 18, 2011

FEI Live Panel with Chief Innovation Officers from Walgreens, Dell, Citigroup & Humana

Have you signed up yet?

Join us at the Front End of Innovation 2011 this May in Boston for a two-Part Chief Innovation Officer Spotlight on Creating Systematic Innovation:

First, Dell's Chief Innovation Officer, Jim Stikeleather, Wednesday's CIO kicks festivities with a keynote on Creating Systematic Innovation.

LIVE Chief Innovation Officer Panel:  immediately following Jim's presentation, he joins his peers for an inside peek at what the top innovation executives are doing in their organizations and how you can incorporate those findings into your strategy. Panel includes Colin Watts, Chief Innovation Officer at Walgreens, Deborah Hopkins, Chief Innovation Officer at Citigroup, and Raja Rajamannar, SVP, Chief Innovation & Marketing Officer at Humana.

Download the Brochure for more details on the conference experience and full session information.

For more information visit the homepage.

Register for FEI US here.

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Innovation Requires Creative Intelligence

C. Engdahl
The Big E of Big E Toys

And, as imagination bodies forth
The forms of things unknown, the poet’s pen
Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing
A local habitation and a name.

- Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream

I’ve been a fan of the television game show Jeorpardy! for quite some time. And when I heard about the special competition (which began February 14) between the show’s two most celebrated champions – Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter – and an IBM computer named Watson, I was thoroughly intrigued.

A few years ago I spent a considerable amount of time investigating existing technologies and companies focused on understanding the vast array of consumer-oriented information found in the blogosphere. The company I was working for at the time was specifically interested in harvesting and understanding the “conversations” taking place in the blogosphere amongst consumers. We wanted to understand trends in consumer behavior and in some cases wanted to understand the implications of these conversations as they related to the specific brands of our clients - what were people talking about in the blogosphere?, who was doing the talking?, and were they speaking kindly or negatively about their subject? Some of the companies in question included Umbria, Scout Labs, Buzzback, and Collective Intellect. The software technologies themselves revolved around understanding “natural language.”

And it appears one of the great computer innovations in understanding “natural language” is Watson.

Enough has been written about Watson in recent weeks that I don’t feel obliged to actually talk much about it or describe its capabilities. I’ve watched it in action on Jeopardy! as well as seen the NOVA special and read other accounts of its development and exploits. To me it doesn’t really matter that the questions posed on Jeopardy! during the last few days have only seemed worthy of Jeopardy’s college episodes. Or that Watson has a distinct advantage over its human competition by being able to buzz in at precisely the right time. The machine is downright amazing.

Despite all its capabilities though, I can’t help think that everything about it and all the knowledge that it possesses was created by humans. Created being the operative would. Everything that Watson can do, and everything it knows, all the documents it searches and parses before offering a response was created by humans. Watson doesn’t really create anything of its own. The creative intelligence used to create Watson and the creative intelligence used to create all the information housed in its memory is even more amazing than the machine itself.

Innovation does not simply result from a set of rules or algorithms. It requires creative intelligence. Watson may be an innovation, but in its current incarnation, it can never be innovative.

Monday, February 14, 2011

We need an idea management system but I’m afraid it will confuse my users with too many options


We need an idea management system but I’m afraid it will confuse my users with too many options

I hear a sentence something like the title to this entry every other visit with someone who sees our idea management software. They are usually stunned by the wonderful user interface that provides a creative environment for smart people to collaborate. But they worry that members of their team won’t use it because there’s too much on the screen.

The worries include:

1. Our user community will get overwhelmed by so many things on screen and won’t know what to click first.

OK, that’s a short list. But a legitimate concern.

The Dilemma

The fuzzy front end of innovation requires a collaborative tool. These Facebook-like environments provide a place for users to shop for interesting things to click on; to comment on them; to vote on the winning suggestions from their peers. Collaborative tools like idea management systems allow users to post interesting information in order to share. The systems encourage folks to post their ideas and for others to work together to enhance these concepts.

This collaborative tool provides a chaotic, disruptive environment for the production of serendipitous idea creation.

And a number of software vendors in this space, quite proudly, offer a feature-rich product, arrived at as a result of working on it for as much as a decade. When you have a client community that likes your offering and pushes it to its limits, they give feedback about the short falls. These suggestions get rolled into product development pipelines and the software ends up with everything anyone would ever want in an idea management software system. New clients benefit.

Part of the software enhancement process is the constant awareness that the user interface must be useful. Development teams pay as much attention to getting users to click things as the quality of the things users can click.

This means most idea management systems can be stripped down to just a few choices or can have every bell & whistle strategically placed on a screen. The best software systems in the idea management space allow for the administration of the system so that categories of users can get similar screens. Perhaps this means that everyone in the organization who is an engineer has a similar screen or that everyone who is a manager has a similar screen. There can be a “new user” interface and an “experienced operator” screen (and a bunch in between).

The user interface deployed in Phase II or III of the system roll out may have more features present than the user interface used during the pilot or proof of concept testing.

In fact, the screens presented to outside stakeholders who participate in the ideation process…those people like partners, customers or even the public…needs to have a very simple screen presented to them. These users’ ideas are welcome but they’re not likely going to get any training so the user interface is usually limited to just ideas, votes and comments. And the graphics are typically extremely engaging to catch people’s interest in a fun way. Having an idea contest is just a method to get this type of user involved…creative use of Persuasive Design and Fun capture the imagination and guide both eyes and clicking fingers.

Best Practices Are The Path To Success

More important than the user interface is how to deploy the system properly. The other great advantage of working with an idea management software vendor that has a history helping large organizations deploy idea management systems (besides a constant stream of enhancements) is the wealth of experience gleaned from deployments. The professional services teams develop best practices.

This knowledge base includes:

1. How to pick the best first user group of “early adopters” and “innovators”.

2. How to pick a common area of interest for users from different time zones and different disciplines and different company divisions to be interested in a collaboration process on their subject.

3. How to create organic growth.

4. A thorough integration of email with links to ongoing discussions so users can be drawn into conversations. E mails can be the right vehicle for marketing “the new idea management system” to the user community. And email integration can involve users who are on the road into the ideation process.

In fact a decision might be made to put a landing page as the first screen, one that accomplishes a task required for a great roll out. Perhaps a choice between signing on to submit an unsolicited idea or participate in radical innovation. Maybe the whole idea management system is a corner of the landscape provided to employees as part of an intranet.

The point is, don't worry about the user interface too much, because a good team will tailor the system to the requirements they encounter during the first discovery workshops. As a baseline, you should expect your company logo and company colors to be part of the system.

Best practices for deployments of idea management systems are just as important as the quality of the idea management system itself. Professional services expertise combines with a flexible idea management system to give organizations the confidence to know they’re approaching ground previously trod. Your idea management software team should have a bunch of installations under their belt. They've already encountered many situations somehow similar to yours. Success lies in your future not because of wishes and hopes but because best practice approaches guide the route to exciting, idea-producing deployments.

Your concern will shortly go from “will they use it” to the clamor of those on your team who want “in” on the new idea management system because they’ve learned that’s where the action is.

Ron Shulkin is Vice President of the Americas for CogniStreamer®, an innovation management system. You can learn more about CogniStreamer here http://bit.ly/ac3x60

Ron manages The Idea Management Group on LinkedIn (Join Here) http://bit.ly/dvsYWD . He has written extensively on Idea Management (Read Here) http://bit.ly/b2ZEgU .

CogniStreamer® is an idea management software tool. It is an open innovation and collaboration platform where internal colleagues and external partner companies or knowledge centers join forces to create, develop and assess innovative ideas within strategically selected areas. The CogniStreamer® portal is an ideal collaborative platform that invites users to actively build a strong innovation portfolio. In addition it provides a powerful resource for internal and external knowledge sharing. The CogniStreamer® framework is used by industry leaders such as Atlas Copco, Bekaert, Case New Holland, Cytec, Imec, Picanol and ThyssenKrupp. CogniStreamer® represents the best use of adaptive collaborative technology such to harness human skill, ingenuity and intelligence.

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